Longevity is Linked to Omega-3 Consumption

The fact that we’re still confused about fat-containing foods seems like a hangover from the ’90s, even though we’ve long past Tamagotchis and AOL. Although doctors, dietitians, and researchers have been stating that omega-3s and omega-6 fatty acids are essential for heart, gut, and brain health, the marketing of “low-fat” products has proven difficult to overcome.

An American Journal of Clinical Nutrition study published recently confirms the health benefits of omega-3s in particular. Researchers examined the omega-3 levels in the blood of 2,240 participants over 11 years to determine if there is a correlation between omega-3s and longevity. Was anything discovered? According to the researchers, individuals over the age of 65 with higher omega-3 levels will be less likely to die from heart disease. They found that people without smoking who had high omega-3 levels in their blood had the best survival rate.

Is there a connection between omega-3 foods and long-term health? RD Amanda Baker Lemein, who is not affiliated with the study, explains that omega-3s are associated with heart health benefits, as well as a potential role in reducing inflammation. Several sources of omega-3 fatty acids exist, including some of the most nutrient-rich foods.

Alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) are three of the main omega-3 fatty acids, Lemein says. It is also important to note that omega-6 fatty acids, mainly found in vegetable oils, are also unsaturated fats that are also important for heart health. Western diets, however, consist of much more omega-6 fatty acids than omega-3 fats. In order to reach a more balanced ratio of omega-6s to omega-3s, experts recommend consuming more omega-3 foods, which [by contrast] are very scarce in the typical Western diet.”

How do you know if you’re getting enough? Here, Lemein highlights the five top omega-3 foods for heart health and longevity:

1. Fish that is fat

In Lemein’s opinion, fish is a good omega-3 source. These nutrients are particularly abundant in fatty fish such as salmon, sardines, tuna, and mackerel. Many nutrition experts recommend beginning by incorporating two portions of fatty fish into your diet every week,” Lemein says.

Can fish oil supplements deliver the same benefits? Watch the video below to find out:

2. Flourseeds

Omega-3’s are abundant in flaxseeds, but they may be small. They’ve been known to help reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease due to their high omega-3 content. Flaxseeds also contain magnesium, thiamine, and fiber, and are rich in omega-3 fatty acids.

3. Seeds of chia

In addition to the small but mighty sunflower, Lemein suggests chia seeds are a good source of healthy fats. In appearance, they are very similar to flaxseeds, but they are not related to each other. Compared with flaxseeds, chia seeds contain more fiber and protein, but they are both rich in omega-3s. Adding a teaspoon to your meal increases its nutritional density instantly.

4. Almonds

Walnuts have the most omega-3s of all nuts, but as far as foods with omega-3s are concerned, walnuts lead the field. It’s why the nut can improve your cardiovascular health, improve your cognitive function, reduce depression symptoms, and reduce inflammation.

5. Oils from algae

You can also increase the omega-3s in your meal by the ingredients you use. The oil from algae, he explains, is particularly rich in this fatty acid. Flaxseed oil, canola oil, and walnut oil all have omega-3 content — not a surprise, I guess?

Dietary intake of omega-3 fatty acids should be adequate, Lemein suggests. She outlined foods to start with above. As it happens, all of these foods are delicious and you can count on them lasting for quite a while if you incorporate them into your diet regularly.

2. Flourseeds

Omega-3’s are abundant in flaxseeds, but they may be small. They’ve been known to help reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease due to their high omega-3 content. Flaxseeds also contain magnesium, thiamine, and fiber, and are rich in omega-3 fatty acids.

3. Seeds of chia

In addition to the small but mighty sunflower, Lemein suggests chia seeds are a good source of healthy fats. In appearance, they are very similar to flaxseeds, but they are not related to each other. Compared with flaxseeds, chia seeds contain more fiber and protein, but they are both rich in omega-3s. Adding a teaspoon to your meal increases its nutritional density instantly.

4. Almonds

Walnuts have the most omega-3s of all nuts, but as far as foods with omega-3s are concerned, walnuts lead the field. It’s why the nut can improve your cardiovascular health, improve your cognitive function, reduce depression symptoms, and reduce inflammation.

5. Oils from algae

You can also increase the omega-3s in your meal by the ingredients you use. The oil from algae, he explains, is particularly rich in this fatty acid. Flaxseed oil, canola oil, and walnut oil all have omega-3 content — not a surprise, I guess?

Dietary intake of omega-3 fatty acids should be adequate, Lemein suggests. She outlined foods to start with above. As it happens, all of these foods are delicious and you can count on them lasting for quite a while if you incorporate them into your diet regularly.

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